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rcmgr(8)							     rcmgr(8)



NAME

  rcmgr, rc.config - Gets, sets, or deletes runtime configuration variables
  stored in the	files /etc/rc.config, /etc/rc.config.common, and
  /etc/rc.config.site

SYNOPSIS

  /usr/sbin/rcmgr [-c  | -s] delete variable

  /usr/sbin/rcmgr [-c  | -s] get variable [value]

  /usr/sbin/rcmgr [-c  | -s] mget variable [value]

  /usr/sbin/rcmgr [-c  | -s] set variable value

  /usr/sbin/rcmgr [-h  | -n] [member_number] get variable [value]

  /usr/sbin/rcmgr [-h  | -n] [member_number] mget variable [value]

  /usr/sbin/rcmgr [-h  | -n] [member_number] set variable value

  /usr/sbin/rcmgr [-h  | -n] [member_number] delete variable

OPTIONS

  The rcmgr command is used with at most one of	the options -c,	-s, -h,	or
  -n. The options -c and -s are	called file options and	-h is called the host
  option.

  -c  Operations are performed on /etc/rc.config.common, the clusterwide con-
      figuration file.

  -s  Operations are performed on /etc/rc.config.site, the sitewide confi-
      guration file.

  -h member_number
      Operations are performed on the /etc/rc.config file for the cluster
      member whose member ID corresponds to member_number.

  -n member_number
      Operations are performed only on the node-specific file.

DESCRIPTION

  The rcmgr command retrieves, sets, or	deletes	runtime	configuration vari-
  ables	stored in the hierarchy	of configuration files:	/etc/rc.config,
  /etc/rc.config.common, and /etc/rc.config.site. These	three files are
  together referred to as /etc/rc.config*. The runtime variables are used to
  configure various subsystems (for example, NFS or NTP) via scripts in	the
  /sbin/init.d directory.








				    Caution

       You should always use rcmgr to make changes to the files.  This will
       preserve	the correct syntax in the files. A lock	file, /etc/rcmgr.lock
       prevents	multiple access	to the data files.

  These	files are used as follows:

    +  On a standalone system, configuration variables in both /etc/rc.config
       and /etc/rc.config.common are used to configure the system.

    +  In a cluster, configuration variables defined in	the
       /etc/rc.config.common file are shared by	all cluster members. Because
       the /etc/rc.config file is defined as a context-dependent symbolic
       link (and must be maintained as such), there is a distinct
       /etc/rc.config file for each member in a	cluster. The configuration
       variable	settings in any	given member's /etc/rc.config file apply only
       to that member.

    +  You can also create a sitewide configuration file named
       /etc/rc.config.site and distribute it among systems in a	local area
       network or at a particular site.	Note that Tru64	UNIX does not ship
       with such a file. If you	decide to use a	sitewide configuration file,
       you must	create it, copy	it to /etc/rc.config.site on each participat-
       ing system, and edit each participating system's	/etc/rc.config file
       to include the following	command	just before the	similar	line that
       executes	./etc/rc.config.common:


	    # Read in the cluster sitewide attributes before overriding	them
	    # with the clusterwide and member-specific values.
	    #
	     . /etc/rc.config.site
	    #



  The hierarchy	of the /etc/rc.config* files allows an administrator to
  define configuration variables consistently over all nodes within a local
  area network and within a cluster. Variables that are	the same for all
  machines on a	LAN can	be defined in a	sitewide file. Variables that are not
  specific to a	given machine and are (or could	be) shared by all members of
  a cluster should be defined in the clusterwide file. Finally,	variables
  specific to a	given machine's	hardware configuration should be defined in
  the machine-specific file (or	each machine-specific file in a	cluster).

  Command options either search	the file hierarchy or operate directly on the
  the appropriate file as follows:

  ________________________________________________________________
  Option		get	    mget	set	    delete
  ________________________________________________________________
  -s			direct	    direct	direct	    direct
  -c			direct	    direct	direct	    direct
  -n			direct	    direct	direct	    direct
  -h			hierarchy   hierarchy	direct	    direct
			hierarchy   hierarchy	hierarchy   direct

  Null (no option
  specified)
  ________________________________________________________________

  For example, the -h and -n options do	exactly	the same thing for set and
  delete operations.  For get and mget operations, the -n option operates
  only on the the rc.config file. Consider the following command:

       # rcmgr -h 2 get	NUM_TCPD

  If the variable NUM_TCPD is not defined in the rc.config file, the rcmgr
  command searches the rc.config.common	file next. If the value	is found in
  the rc.config.common file, it	is returned. If	not, the rcmgr command
  searches the rc.config.site file.

  In contrast, you can specify the -n option as	follows:

       # rcmgr -n 2 get	NUM_TCPD

  In this case,	if NUM_TCPD is not defined in the rc.config file, then no
  value	is returned and	no other files in the hierarchy	are searched.

  The operations are defined in	the following section.

OPERATIONS

  get The get operation	returns	one of the following: the value	of variable
      defined in one of	the /etc/rc.config* files, value, or null.

	+  If the -coption is specified, the command looks only	in the
	   /etc/rc.config.common file.

	+  If the -s option is specified, the command looks only in the
	   /etc/rc.config.site file.

	+  If the -h member_number option is specified,	the command returns
	   the value as	defined	for the	cluster	member whose member ID
	   corresponds to member_number.

	+  If the -n member_number option is specified,	the command looks
	   only	in the /etc/rc.config file.

      The get operation	uses a standard	search order: it first looks in
      /etc/rc.config; it then looks in /etc/rc.config.common; finally it
      looks in /etc/rc.config.site.

      If no file or host option	is specified, the command finds	the first
      definition of variable, using the	standard search	order.

      If the variable is not found in any of the files,	the command returns
      value, if	specified; otherwise it	returns	null.

      If the value of a	variable is set	to "" (null), then an rcmgr get
      operation	on that	variable will return an	empty string.

  mget
      With no option specified,	the mget operation returns all the variables
      defined in any of	the /etc/rc.config* files, using the standard search
      order. If	a variable is defined in more than one of the files, the
      first value encountered is returned. If -h member_number is specified,
      the operation functions identically, except it returns the values	as
      defined for the cluster member whose member ID corresponds to
      member_number, using the standard	search order.

      If the -n	member_number option is	specified, the command looks only in
      the /etc/rc.config file.

      The values are output one	per line in the	form variable=value.

  set If no option is specified, the set operation uses	the standard search
      order to set variable to value in	the first /etc/rc.config* file in
      which it finds a definition of variable. If no definition	is found, the
      set is done in the local /etc/rc.config file.

      If -c or -s is specified,	the set	is done	in /etc/rc.config.common or
      /etc/rc.config.site, respectively. If -h member_number is	specified,
      the set is done in the /etc/rc.config file for the cluster member	whose
      member ID	corresponds to member_number.

  delete
      If no option is specified, the delete operation removes variable from
      the /etc/rc.config file. The standard search order is not	used. If -c
      or -s is specified, the delete is	done in	the /etc/rc.config.common or
      /etc/rc.config.site file,	respectively. If -h member_number or -n
      member_number is specified, the delete is	done in	the /etc/rc.config
      file for the cluster member whose	member ID corresponds to
      member_number.

ERRORS

  If there is an error in an argument passed to	rcmgr, or if a file option
  was specified	but the	file does not exist, rcmgr returns an error message
  and aborts execution with the	exit value 1.

EXAMPLES

   1.  This example sets the variable HOSTNAME to yukio	in the /etc/rc.config
       file.
	    rcmgr set HOSTNAME yukio

   2.  This example sets the variable IFCONFIG_0 to 111.111.1.11 netmask
       255.255.252.0 in	the /etc/rc.config file.
	    rcmgr set IFCONFIG_0 111.111.1.11 netmask 255.255.252.0

   3.  This example displays the value of the variable NIS_ARGS	in the first
       definition of NIS_ARGS it finds using the standard search order.	If no
       value is	found in any of	the /etc/rc.config* files, the command
       returns null.
	    rcmgr get NIS_ARGS



  Startup scripts can use the get operation to provide values to variables as
  in the following examples.

   1.  This example sets the value of netdevs to the value of MAX_NETDEVS in
       the /etc/rc.config file on node barney.	If no value is defined,	it
       sets netdevs to 24.
	    netdevs=`rcmgr -h barney get MAX_NETDEVS 24`

   2.  This example sets num_nfsd to 4 if NUM_NFSD is not defined in any of
       the /etc/rc.config* files. Otherwise, it	sets num_nfsd to the value
       specified in the	first definition of NUM_NFSD it	finds using the	stan-
       dard search order.
	    num_nfsd=`rcmgr get	NUM_NFSD 4`

   3.  This example deletes the	definition of the variable NETDEV_1 from the
       clusterwide file	/etc/rc.config.common.
	    rcmgr -c delete NETDEV_1








FILES

  /etc/rc.config

  /etc/rc.config.common

  /etc/rc.config.site

  /etc/rcmgr.lock
      Prevents applications from accessing the data files concurrently,	which
      could cause data corruption.

SEE ALSO

  System Administration