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INETD(8C)                                                            INETD(8C)



NAME
       inetd - Internet services daemon

SYNOPSIS
       /usr/etc/inetd [ -d ] [ configuration-file ]

DESCRIPTION
       inetd,  the  Internet  services daemon, is normally run at boot time by
       the /etc/rc.local script.  When started inetd reads  its  configuration
       information from configuration-file, the default being /etc/inetd.conf.
       See inetd.conf(5) for more information on the format of this file.   It
       listens  for connections on the Internet addresses of the services that
       its configuration file specifies.   When  a  connection  is  found,  it
       invokes  the server daemon specified by that configuration file for the
       service requested.  Once a server is finished, inetd continues to  lis-
       ten on the socket (except in some cases which will be described below).

       Depending  on the value of the "wait-status" field in the configuration
       line for the service, inetd will either wait for the server to complete
       before  continuing  to listen on the socket, or immediately continue to
       listen on the socket.  If the server is  a  "single-threaded"  datagram
       server (a "wait-status" field of "wait"), inetd must wait.  That server
       will handle all datagrams on the socket.  All other servers (stream and
       xlti-threaded" data-gram, a "wait-status" field of "nowait") operate on
       separate sockets from the connection request socket, thus  freeing  the
       listening socket for new connection requests.

       Rather  than  having several daemon processes with sparsely distributed
       requests each running concurrently, inetd reduces the load on the  sys-
       tem by invoking Internet servers only as they are needed.

       inetd  itself  provides  a  number of simple TCP-based services.  These
       include echo, discard, chargen (character  generator),  daytime  (human
       readable  time),  and  time  (machine readable time, in the form of the
       number of seconds since midnight, January 1,  1900).   For  details  of
       these  services, consult the appropriate RFC, as listed below, from the
       Network Information Center.

       inetd rereads its configuration file whenever it receives a hangup sig-
       nal,  SIGHUP.   New  services  can  be activated, and existing services
       deleted or modified in between whenever the file is reread.

SEE ALSO
       inetd.conf(5), comsat(8C), ftpd(8C), rexecd(8C), rlogind(8C), rshd(8C),
       telnetd(8C), tftpd(8C)

       Postel,  Jon,  Echo  Protocol, RFC 862, Network Information Center, SRI
       International, Menlo Park, Calif., May 1983.

       Postel, Jon, Discard Protocol, RFC 863, Network Information Center, SRI
       International, Menlo Park, Calif., May 1983.

       Postel, Jon, Character Generator Protocol, RFC 864, Network Information
       Center, SRI International, Menlo Park, Calif., May 1983.

       Postel, Jon, Daytime Protocol, RFC 867, Network Information Center, SRI
       International, Menlo Park, Calif., May 1983.

       Postel,  Jon,  and  Ken  Harrenstien,  Time  Protocol, RFC 868, Network
       Information Center, SRI International, Menlo Park, Calif., May 1983.



                               17 November 1987                      INETD(8C)