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File Formats                                    volume-request(4)



NAME
     volume-request, volume-defaults  -  Solaris  Volume  Manager
     configuration  information for top down volume creation with
     metassist

SYNOPSIS
     /usr/share/lib/xml/dtd/volume-request.dtd

     /usr/share/lib/xml/dtd/volume-defaults.dtd

DESCRIPTION
     A volume request file,  XML-based  and  compliant  with  the
     volume-request.dtd  Document  Type Definition, describes the
     characteristics of the volumes that  metassist  should  pro-
     duce.

     A system administrator would use  the  volume  request  file
     instead  of  providing  options  at the command line to give
     more specific instructions about the characteristics of  the
     volumes to create.

     If you start metassist by providing a volume-request file as
     input,  metassist  can implement the configuration specified
     in the file, can generate a command file that  sets  up  the
     configuraiton  for you to inspect or edit, or can generate a
     volume configuration file for you to inspect or edit.

     As a system administrator, you would want to create a volume
     request file if you need to reuse configurations (and do not
     want to reenter the  same  command  arguments),  or  if  you
     prefer to use a configuration file to specify volume charac-
     teristics.

     Volume request files must be valid XML  that  complies  with
     the document type definition in the volume-request.dtd file,
     located  at  /usr/share/lib/xml/dtd/volume-request.dtd.  You
     create  a  volume  request  file, and provide it as input to
     metassist to create volumes from the top down.

  Defining Volume Request
     The top level element <volume-request> surrounds the  volume
     request  data.  This  element  has  no  attributes. A volume
     request requires at least one <diskset> element, which  must
     be the first element after <volume-request>.

     Optionally, the <volume-request> element can include one  or
     more <available> and <unavailable> elements to specify which
     controllers or disks associated with a  specific  controller
     can or cannot be used to create the volume.

     Optionally, the <volume-request> element can include a <hsp>
     element  to  specify  characteristics of a hot spare pool if



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File Formats                                    volume-request(4)



     fault recovery is used.

     If not specified for a volume with fault-recovery, the first
     hot  spare  pool  found  in  the disk set is used. If no hot
     spare pool exists but one is required, a hot spare  pool  is
     created.

     Optionally, the volume-request can include one or more <con-
     cat>,  <stripe>,  <mirror>,  <volume>  elements  to  specify
     volumes to create.

  Defining Disk Set
     Within the <volume-request>  element,  a  <diskset>  element
     must  exist. The <diskset> element, with the name attribute,
     specifies the name of the disk set to be used. If this  disk
     set does not exist, it is created. This element and the name
     attribute are required.

  Defining Availability
     Within the <volume-request> element and  within  other  ele-
     ments,  you  can specify available or unavailable components
     (disks, or disks on a specific controller path) for  use  or
     exclusion from use in a volume or hot spare pool.

     The <available> and <unavailable> elements  require  a  name
     attribute  which specifies either a full ctd name, or a par-
     tial ctd name that is used with the implied wildcard to com-
     plete  the  expression.  For  example,  specifying c3t2d0 as
     available would look like:

     <available name="/dev/dsk/c3t2d0">

      Specifying all disks on controller 2 as  unavailable  would
     look like:

     <unavailable name="c2">

     Components specified as available must be either part of the
     named  disk  set  used  for this volume creation, or must be
     unused and not in  any  disk  set.  If  the  components  are
     selected  for  use, the metassist command automatically adds
     them.

     It is unnecessary to specify components that  are  in  other
     disk  sets  as unavailable. metassist automatically excludes
     them from consideration. However, unused components or  com-
     ponents  that  are  not  obviously  used  (for  example., an
     unmounted slice that is reserved for different uses) must be
     explicitly specified as unused, or the metassist command can
     include them in the configuration.





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File Formats                                    volume-request(4)



  Defining Hot Spare Pool
     The next element within the <volume-request> element,  after
     the <diskset> and, optionally, <available> and <unavailable>
     elements, is the <hsp> element. Its sole attribute specifies
     the name of the hot spare pool:

     <hsp name="hsp001">

      The hot spare pool names must start with hsp  and  conclude
     with  a  number,  thus following the existing Solaris Volume
     Manager hot spare pool naming requirements.

     Within the <hsp>  element,  you  can  specify  one  or  more
     <available>  and  <unavailable>  elements  to  specify which
     disks, or disks associated with a specific controller can or
     cannot be used to create the hot spares within the pool.

     Also within the <hsp> element, you can use the <slice>  ele-
     ment  to  specify hot spares to be included in the hot spare
     pool (see DEFINING SLICE).  Depending  on  the  requirements
     placed  on  the  hot spare pool by other parts of the volume
     request, additional slices can be added  to  the  hot  spare
     pool.

  Defining Slice
     The <slice> element is used to define slices to  include  or
     exclude  within  other  elements.  It  requires  only a name
     attribute to specify the ctd name of the slice, and the con-
     text  of  the <slice> element determines the function of the
     element. Sample slice elements might look like:

     <slice name="c0t1d0s2"></slice>
     <slice name="c0t12938567201lkj29561sllkj381d0s2" />

  Defining Stripe
     The <stripe> element  defines  stripes  (interlaced  RAID  0
     volumes) to be used in a volume. It can contain either slice
     elements (to explicitly determine which slices are used), or
     appropriate  combinations  of available and unavailable ele-
     ments if the specific determination of slices is to be  left
     to the metassist command.

     The <stripe> element takes an  optional  name  attribute  to
     specify  a  name.  If the name isn't specified, an available
     name is automatically selected from available Solaris Volume
     Manager names. If possible, names for related components are
     related.

     The <stripe> element takes an optional size  attribute  that
     specifies  the  size  as value and units (for example, 10TB,
     5GB). If slices for the <stripe> are  explicitly  specified,
     the   size   attribute   is  ignored.  The  <available>  and



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File Formats                                    volume-request(4)



     <unavailable> elements can be used to constrain  slices  for
     use in a stripe.

     The <stripe> elements takes  optional  mincomp  and  maxcomp
     attributes to specify both the minimum and maximum number of
     components that can be included in  it.  As  with  size,  if
     slices  for  the <stripe> are explicitly specified, the min-
     comp and maxcomp attributes are ignored.

     The <stripe> elements takes an optional interlace  attribute
     as  value  and  units (for example, 16KB, 5BLOCKS, 20KB). If
     this value  isn't  specified,  the  Solaris  Volume  Manager
     default value is used.

     The <stripe> element takes an optional usehsp  attribute  to
     specify  if  a hot spare pool should be associated with this
     component. This attribute is specified as a  boolean  value,
     as  usehsp="TRUE". If the component is not a submirror, this
     attribute is ignored.

  Defining Concat
     The <concat> element defines concats (non-interlaced RAID  0
     volumes)  to  be used in a configuration. It is specified in
     the same way as a <stripe> element, except that the mincomp,
     maxcomp, and interlace attributes are not valid.

  Defining Mirror
     The <mirror> element defines mirrors (RAID 1 volumes) to  be
     used  in a volume configuration. It can contain combinations
     of <concat> and <stripe> elements (to  explicitly  determine
     which volumes are used as submirrors). Alternatively, it can
     have a size attribute specified, along with the  appropriate
     combinations  of available and unavailable elements to leave
     the specific determination of components  to  the  metassist
     command.

     The <mirror> element takes an  optional  name  attribute  to
     specify  a  name.  If the name isn't specified, an available
     name is automatically selected.

     The <mirror> element takes an optional size  attribute  that
     specifies  the  size  as value and units (for example, 10TB,
     5GB). If <stripe> and <concat> elements for the  mirror  are
     not  specified, this attribute is required. Otherwise, it is
     ignored.

     The <mirror> element takes an optional nsubmirrors attribute
     to  define  the  number of submirrors (1-4) to include. Like
     the size attribute, this attribute is ignored if the  under-
     lying <concat> and <stripe> submirrors are explicitly speci-
     fied. The <mirror> element takes an optional read  attribute
     to define the mirror read options (ROUNDROBIN, GEOMETRIC, or



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File Formats                                    volume-request(4)



     FIRST) for the mirror. If this attribute is  not  specified,
     the Solaris Volume Manager default value is used.

     The <mirror> element takes an optional  write  attribute  to
     define the mirror write options (PARALLEL, SERIAL, or FIRST)
     for the mirror. If this  attribute  is  not  specified,  the
     Solaris Volume Manager default value is used.

     The <mirror> element takes an optional usehsp  attribute  to
     specify  if  a hot spare pool should be associated with each
     submirror. This attribute is specified as a  boolean  value,
     as  usehsp="TRUE".  If  the usehsp attribute is specified in
     the configuration of the <stripe> or <concat>  element  used
     as  a submirror, it overrides the value of usehsp attributes
     for the mirror as a whole.

  Defining Volume by Quality of Service
     The <volume> element defines  volumes  (high-level)  by  the
     quality  of  service they should provide. (The <volume> ele-
     ment offers the  same  functionality  that  options  on  the
     metassist command line can provide.)

     The <volume> element can contain combinations of <available>
     and <unavailable> elements to determine which components can
     be included in the configuration.

     The <volume> element takes an  optional  name  attribute  to
     specify  a  name.  If the name isn't specified, an available
     name is automatically selected.

     The <volume> element takes a required  size  attribute  that
     specifies  the  size  as value and units (for example, 10TB,
     5GB).

     The <volume> element takes an optional redundancy  attribute
     to  define  the number of additional copies of data (1-4) to
     include. In a  worst-case  scenario,  a  volume  can  suffer
     failure   of   n-1   components  without  data  loss,  where
     redundancy=n. With fault recovery options, the volume  could
     withstand  up  to  n+hsps-1  non-concurrent failures without
     data loss. Specifying  redundancy=0  results  in  a  RAID  0
     volume being created (a stripe, specifically).

     The <volume> element takes an optional faultrecovery  attri-
     bute  to  determine if additional components should be allo-
     cated to recover from component failures in the volume. This
     is a boolean attribute, with a default value of FALSE.

     The <volume> element takes an optional  datapaths  attribute
     to  determine  if  multiple data paths should be required to
     access the volume. The datapaths attribute should be set  to
     a numeric value.



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File Formats                                    volume-request(4)



  Defining Default Values Globally
     Global defaults can be  set  in  /etc/default/metassist.xml.
     This  volume-defaults file can contain most of the same ele-
     ments as a volume-request  file,  but  differs  structurally
     from a volume-request file:

        o  The container element must be  <volume-defaults>,  not
           <volume-request>.

        o  The <volume-defaults> element can contain <available>,
           <unavailable>, <hsp>, <concat>, <stripe>, <mirror>, or
           <volume> elements.


     Attributes specified by these elements define global default
     values,  unless  overridden  by the corresponding attributes
     and elements in a volume-request. None of these elements  is
     a container element.

        o  The <volume-defaults> element can contain one or  more
           <diskset>   elements   to  provide  disk  set-specific
           defaults. The <diskset> element  can  contain  <avail-
           able>, <unavailable>, <hsp>, <concat>, <stripe>, <mir-
           ror>, or <volume> elements.

        o  Settings specified  outside  of  a  <diskset>  element
           apply  to  all disk sets, but can be overridden within
           each <diskset> element.

EXAMPLES
     Example 1: Creating a Redundant Volume

     The following example shows a volume request  file  used  to
     create a redundant and fault tolerant volume of 1TB.

     <volume-request>
       <diskset name="sparestorage">
       <volume size="1TB" redundancy="2" faultrecovery="TRUE">
         <available name="c2" />
         <available name="c3" />
         <unavailable name="c2t2d0" />
       </volume>
     </volume-request>


     Example 2: Creating a Complex Configuration

     The following example shows  a  sample  volume-request  file
     that   specifis  a disk set name,  and specifically itemizes
     characteristics of components to create.





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File Formats                                    volume-request(4)



     <volume-request>

         <!-- Specify the disk set to use -->
         <diskset name="mailspool"/>

         <!-- Generally available devices -->
         <available name="c0"/>

         <!-- Create a 3-way mirror with redundant datapaths and HSPs \
               via QoS -->
         <volume size="10GB" redundancy="3" datapaths="2" \
               faultrecovery="TRUE"/>

         <!-- Create a 1-way mirror with a HSP via QoS -->
         <volume size="10GB" faultrecovery="TRUE"/>

         <!-- Create a stripe via QoS -->
         <volume size="100GB"/>


BOUNDARY VALUES
     Attribute       Minimum         Maximum
     mincomp         1               N/A
     maxcomp         N/A             32
     nsubmirrors     1               4
     passnum         0               9
     datapaths       1               4
     redundancy      0               4

FILES
     /usr/share/lib/xml/dtd/volume-request.dtd


     /usr/share/lib/xml/dtd/volume-defaults.dtd


     /etc/lvm/volume-defaults.xml


SEE ALSO
     metassist(1M),  metaclear(1M),  metadb(1M),  metadetach(1M),
     metahs(1M),  metainit(1M),  metaoffline(1M), metaonline(1M),
     metaparam(1M),       metarecover(1M),       metareplace(1M),
     metaroot(1M),   metaset(1M),   metasync(1M),  metattach(1M),
     mount_ufs(1M), mddb.cf(4)

     Solaris Volume Manager Administration Guide








SunOS 5.9           Last change: 26 Jun 2003                    7