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MEMORY(3)                  Library Functions Manual                  MEMORY(3)



NAME
       memory, memccpy, memchr, memcmp, memcpy, memset - memory operations

SYNOPSIS
       #include <&lt;memory.h>&gt;

       char *memccpy(s1, s2, c, n)
       char *s1, *s2;
       int c, n;

       char *memchr(s, c, n)
       char *s;
       int c, n;

       int memcmp(s1, s2, n)
       char *s1, *s2;
       int n;

       char *memcpy(s1, s2, n)
       char *s1, *s2;
       int n;

       char *memset(s, c, n)
       char *s;
       int c, n;

DESCRIPTION
       These  functions  operate  as  efficiently  as possible on memory areas
       (arrays of characters bounded by a count,  not  terminated  by  a  null
       character).  They do not check for the overflow of any receiving memory
       area.

       memccpy() copies characters from memory area s2 into s1, stopping after
       the first occurrence of character c has been copied, or after n charac-
       ters have been copied, whichever comes first.  It returns a pointer  to
       the character after the copy of c in s1, or a NULL pointer if c was not
       found in the first n characters of s2.

       memchr() returns a pointer to the first occurrence of  character  c  in
       the  first  n  characters of memory area s, or a NULL pointer if c does
       not occur.

       memcmp() compares its arguments, looking  at  the  first  n  characters
       only,  and  returns  an integer less than, equal to, or greater than 0,
       according as s1 is lexicographically less than, equal  to,  or  greater
       than s2.

       memcpy() copies n characters from memory area s2 to s1.  It returns s1.

       memset()  sets  the first n characters in memory area s to the value of
       character c.  It returns s.

NOTES
       For user convenience, all these functions are  declared  in  the  <&lt;mem-
       ory.h>&gt; header file.

BUGS
       memcmp()  uses  native  character  comparison,  which is signed on some
       machines and unsigned on other machines.  Thus the sign  of  the  value
       returned  when  one  of  the  characters  has its high-order bit set is
       implementation-dependent.

       Character movement is performed differently  in  different  implementa-
       tions.  Thus overlapping moves may yield surprises.



                                6 October 1987                       MEMORY(3)