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 vxdg(1M)			  VxVM 3.5			    vxdg(1M)
				 1 Jun 2002



 NAME
      vxdg - manage VERITAS Volume Manager disk groups

 SYNOPSIS
      vxdg  [ -g diskgroup ] [ -kp ] [ -o verify | override] adddisk
	    [ medianame=]accessname...

      vxdg  [ -n newname ] [ -h newhostid ] deport diskgroup...

      vxdg [ -o verify | override] destroy diskgroup...

      vxdg flush [diskgroup...]

      vxdg  [ -g diskgroup ] [ -qa ] free [ medianame...]

      vxdg  [ -Cfst ] [ -n  newname ] import diskgroup

      vxdg  [ -T version ] [ -s ] [ -o verify | override]  init
	    groupname [ nconfig=config-copies ] [ nlog=log-copies ]
	    [ minor=base-minor ] [ medianame =] accessname...

      vxdg  [ -o override | verify] join sourcedg targetdg

      vxdg  [ -q ] list [diskgroup...]

      vxdg  [ -o expand] listmove sourcedg targetdg object...

      vxdg  [ -o expand] [ -o override | verify] move
	    sourcedg targetdg object...

      vxdg  [ -g diskgroup ] [ -q ] nohotuse [ medianame...]

      vxdg  [ -o clean | remove] recover diskgroup

      vxdg  [ -g diskgroup ] [ -f ]  reminor
	    [diskgroup ]  new-base-minor

      vxdg [-g diskgroup ] [-k ] repldisk
	    unassoc-medianame=spare-medianame...

      vxdg  [ -g diskgroup ] [ -k ] [ -o verify | override] rmdisk
	    medianame...

      vxdg -g diskgroup set attribute=value...

      vxdg  [ -g diskgroup ] [ -q ] spare [ medianame...]

      vxdg  [ -Cft ] [ -o expand] [ -o override | verify] split
	    sourcedg targetdg object...





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 vxdg(1M)			   VxVM 3.5			     vxdg(1M)
				  1 Jun 2002



      vxdg  [ -T version ]  upgrade diskgroup

 DESCRIPTION
      The vxdg utility performs basic administrative operations on disk
      groups.  Operations include the creation of disk groups, the addition
      of disks to a disk group, disk group split/join, and disk group
      imports and deports.

      Note: A license is necessary to use the Disk Group Split/Join feature.

      The behavior of the vxdg utility depends upon the keyword specified as
      the first operand.

      A diskgroup argument can be either a disk group name or a disk
      group ID.	 A groupname argument is a disk group name, not a disk
      group ID.	 An accessname argument refers to a system-dependent disk
      access name (also referred to as a disk device name), as stored in the
      root configuration by the vxdisk utility.	 A medianame argument is an
      administrative name used to define a disk within a disk group.

 KEYWORDS
      adddisk	Adds the specified disk or disks to a disk group (rootdg by
		default).  The disk must not already be part of a disk
		group.	The accessname component to a disk specification
		argument names a disk access record (essentially a device
		address specification) used to access the disk.	 If a
		medianame component is specified, then it names the disk
		media record used to define the disk within the disk group.
		If no medianame component is specified, then the disk media
		record is given the same name as the disk access record.

		Adding a disk to a disk group causes the disk group's
		configuration to be copied onto the disk (if the disk has
		regions for configuration copies).  Also, the disk is
		stamped with the system's host ID, as defined in the volboot
		file.

		If the -k flag is specified, then the disk media name must
		represent a disk media record that was previously
		dissociated from its disk access record with -k rmdisk;
		otherwise, a new disk media record is created to represent
		the disk.  With the -k option, plexes requiring recovery are
		flagged as stale.

		Specifying the -p flag with -k packs contiguous subdisks
		into one subdisk and aligns them consecutively on their
		respective disks.

		In a cluster environment, adding a disk to a cluster-shared
		disk group fails if the disk is not physically accessible
		from all joined nodes in the cluster.  If the addition is



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 vxdg(1M)			  VxVM 3.5			    vxdg(1M)
				 1 Jun 2002



		successful, the disk is stamped with the cluster ID and
		marked with the shared flag.

      deport	Disables access to the specified disk group.  A disk group
		cannot be deported if any volumes in the disk group are
		currently open.	 When a disk group is deported, the host ID
		stored on all disks in the disk group are cleared (unless a
		new host ID is specified with -h), so the disk group is not
		reimported automatically when the system is rebooted.

		A disk group can be renamed on deport by specifying a new
		disk group name with -n newname.  A lock can be assigned to
		an alternate host by specifying the host ID (see vxdctl(1M))
		of the alternate host.	This allows the disk group to be
		auto-imported when the alternate host reboots.	For example,
		the -n and -h options can be combined to export a disk group
		to be used as the rootdg disk group for a new machine.

		In a cluster environment, when a cluster-shared disk group
		is deported, the cluster ID and shared flag stored on all
		disks in the disk group are cleared, so the disk group is
		not imported automatically when the cluster is next started.

		Trying to deport a shared disk group during a cluster
		reconfiguration fails.

      destroy	Removes a disk group from the system.  Use this option when
		a disk group and the information on the disks is no longer
		needed.	 This frees up space for use by other disk groups.
		A disk group cannot be destroyed if any volumes in the disk
		group are open (for example, they are mounted as files
		systems or in use by an application such as a database).
		vxdg destroy can be used only on imported disk groups.

      flush	Rewrites all disk on-disk structures managed by VERITAS
		Volume Manager (VxVM) for the named disk groups.  This
		rewrites all disk headers, configuration copies, and kernel
		log copies.  Also, if any configuration copies were disabled
		(for example as a result of I/O failures), this command
		rewrites those configuration copies, and attempts to enable
		them.

      free	Lists free space that can be used for allocating subdisks.
		If a disk group is specified, limit the output to the
		indicated disk group, otherwise list space from all disk
		groups.	 If disks are specified, by disk media name, then
		restrict the output to the indicated disks.  A region of
		free space is identified by disk media name, a physical
		device tag, an offset relative to the beginning of the
		public region for the media, and a length.




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 vxdg(1M)			  VxVM 3.5			    vxdg(1M)
				 1 Jun 2002



		If the -q option is specified, then no header is printed
		describing output fields.  If the -a option is specified,
		then space on spare disks (which is not really allocatable)
		is listed in addition to regular free space; otherwise,
		space on spare disks is not listed.

      import	Imports a disk group to make the specified disk group
		available on the local machine.	 This makes accessible any
		configuration information stored with the disk group,
		including any disk and volume configurations.  The disk
		group to import is indicated by the diskgroup argument,
		which can be either an administrative disk group name or a
		disk group unique ID.

		Typically, a disk group is not imported if some disks in the
		disk group cannot be found by the local host.  The -f option
		can be used to force an import if, for example, one of the
		disks is currently unusable or inaccessible.

		Note: Be careful when using the -f flag because it can
		import the same disk group twice from disjointed sets of
		disks.	This can make the disk group inconsistent.

		When a disk group is imported, all disks in the disk group
		are stamped with the host's host ID.  Typically, a disk
		group cannot be imported if any of its disks are stamped
		with a non-matching host ID.  This provides a sanity check
		in cases where disks can be accessed from more than one
		host.

		If it is certain that a disk is not in use by another host
		(such as because a disk group was not cleanly deported),
		then the -C option can be used to clear the existing host ID
		on all disks in the disk group as part of the import.  A
		host ID can also be cleared using vxdisk clearimport.

		A new name can be given to the disk group on import using -n
		newname.  If -n is used with the -t option, the stored name
		of the disk group remains unchanged, but the importing host
		knows the disk group under the new name; otherwise, the name
		change is permanent.

		Typically, an imported disk group is reimported
		automatically when the system is rebooted, if at least some
		of the disks in the disk group remain accessible and usable.
		This can be disabled using the -t option, which causes the
		import to be persistent only until the system is rebooted.

		As an example of the use of -n and -t, a rootdg disk group
		from one host can be imported on a second host, operations
		can be performed on the second host and the disk group can



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 vxdg(1M)			  VxVM 3.5			    vxdg(1M)
				 1 Jun 2002



		be given back to the originating host, which can then be
		rebooted on the repaired disk group.  To do this, identify
		the disk group ID for the rootdg disk group with
		vxdisk -s list, and use that disk group to import that
		rootdg using -C to clear import locks, -t for a temporary
		name, and -n to specify an alternate name (to avoid
		collision with the rootdg disk group on the second host).
		After repair, deport the disk group using -h to restore the
		import lock from the first host.

		In a cluster environment, use the -s option to import a disk
		group as cluster-sharable.  This is only valid if the
		cluster is active on the host where the import takes place.
		Ensure that all the disks in a shared disk group are
		physically accessible by all hosts.  A host which cannot
		access all the disks in a shared disk group cannot join the
		cluster.

		The disks in a shared disk group are stamped with the ID of
		the cluster to which the hosts belong and are marked with
		the shared flag.  When a host joins a cluster, it
		automatically imports disk groups whose disks are stamped
		with the cluster ID.

		Trying to import a shared disk group during a cluster
		reconfiguration fails.

      init	Defines a new disk group composed of the indicated disks,
		identified by disk access names.  This involves assigning an
		internal unique ID to the group, storing a pointer to that
		group in the root configuration, storing a reference to the
		group on all of the named disks that have a disk header, and
		storing a disk group record in the disk group's
		configuration database.	 At least one of the disks specified
		must have space allocated for a configuration copy.

		An existing deported disk group is destroyed if it has the
		same name as that specified for the new disk group.

		The init cannot complete if a disk is being used by a disk
		group, deported or otherwise.  If vxdg finds an unneeded
		disk group on the disk, it can be cleaned with the vxdisk -f
		init command.  vxdg init can then be run again.

		If a medianame is specified for use with a particular disk,
		then that medianame names the disk media record used to
		reference the disk within the disk group (for operations
		such as rmdisk and subdisk creations).	If no medianame is
		specified, then the disk media name defaults to accessname.
		See vxdisk(1M) for a discussion of definition and
		initialization of disk access records.



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 vxdg(1M)			  VxVM 3.5			    vxdg(1M)
				 1 Jun 2002



		The init operation can be used to initialize a root disk
		group configuration, which is identified by the special name
		rootdg.	 If any database locations are listed in the volboot
		file, then as a special case for initializing rootdg, no
		disk specifications are allowed.  Disks should be
		initialized and added to the disk group as the first
		operations after creating rootdg.  Some or all disks added
		to the rootdg disk group should also be added to the volboot
		bootstrap file (see vxdctl(1M)).

		The nconfig and nlog operands can be used to configure the
		number of configuration database copies and kernel log
		copies that are maintained for a disk group.  The config-
		copies and log-copies values are either a decimal number
		(including 0 or -1) or set to all or default.  A value of
		all or -1 signifies that all configuration or log copies on
		all disks in the disk group are to be maintained.  A value
		of default or 0 (this is also the default value) signifies
		that VxVM is to manage copies that are distributed in a
		reasonable pattern throughout the disks, controllers and
		enclosures on the system.  Any other number signifies that a
		particular number of copies should be maintained (or all
		copies, if that number is larger than the number of
		available configuration or log copies on all disks).

		When a	specific  number (or  default) is  requested,
		configuration copies are  distributed  across the
		enclosures on  the system. The number of copies	 in  each
		enclosure is  proportional to  the  number of disks in that
		enclosure. With	 the  default policy, at  least one
		configuration and log  copy is	maintained for	each
		enclosure. It is ensured  that at least one configuration
		and log copy is maintained for each host controller
		connected to an enclosure. If  this  does not result in
		allocating at least 4 copies, then  additional copies are
		spread uniformly across enclosures.

		Refer to vxdisk(1M) for more information on configuration
		and log copies, and for information on how to create them.

		Note: If a policy other than all is used, then some disks do
		not have up-to-date, online configuration and log copies.
		As a result, it is possible that some number of disk
		failures can leave a disk group unusable, even if some disks
		in the disk group remain usable.  The default policy
		allocates a sufficient number of copies, in a sufficient
		spread of locations, that such a scenario is very unlikely
		to occur.

		Since disk groups can be moved between systems, it is
		desirable that device numbers used for volumes be allocated



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 vxdg(1M)			  VxVM 3.5			    vxdg(1M)
				 1 Jun 2002



		in separate ranges for each disk group.	 That way, an
		administrator can choose ranges such that all disk groups in
		a group of machines can be moved around without causing
		device number collisions. Collisions may occur because VxVM
		stores device numbers in disk group configurations, so that
		the same numbers can be used after a reboot (which is
		necessary for use with NFS, which requires persistency of
		device numbers).  If two systems use the same device numbers
		for a set of volumes, and if a disk group from one machine
		is moved to the other, then VxVM may be forced to
		temporarily remap some devices.

		A base volume device minor number can be set for a disk
		group with the minor operand.  Volume device numbers for a
		disk group are chosen to have minor numbers starting at this
		base minor number.  Minor numbers can range up to
		16,777,216, so if it is presumed that no more than 1000
		volumes would ever be created in any one disk group, 16,777
		different ranges of minor numbers are available for
		different disk groups.	A reasonably sized range should be
		left at the end for temporary device number remappings (in
		the event that two device numbers still conflict).

		If no minor operand is specified on the init command line,
		then VxVM chooses a random number of at least 1000 that is a
		multiple of 1000, and yields a usable range of 1000 device
		numbers.  This default number is chosen such that it does
		not overlap within a range of 1000 of any currently imported
		disk groups, and does not overlap any currently allocated
		volume device numbers.

		Note: The default policy is likely to ensure that a small
		number of disk groups can be merged successfully between a
		set of machines.  However, in cases where disk groups are
		merged automatically using fail-over mechanisms, the
		administrator should select ranges that are known to avoid
		overlap.

		In a cluster environment, the -s option defines a new disk
		group which is cluster-sharable while the cluster is active.
		It is the responsibility of the user to ensure that disks
		specified as members of a cluster-sharable disk group are
		physically accessible from the hosts that make up the
		cluster.

		The disks in a shared disk group are stamped with the ID of
		the cluster to which the hosts belong and are marked with
		the shared flag.  When a host joins a cluster, it
		automatically imports disk groups whose disks are stamped
		with the cluster ID.




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 vxdg(1M)			  VxVM 3.5			    vxdg(1M)
				 1 Jun 2002



		Trying to create a shared disk group during a cluster
		reconfiguration fails.

		Note: Volumes in shared disk groups must have the same minor
		number on all nodes in the cluster.  If there is a conflict
		when a node attempts to join the cluster, the join fails.
		In that case, the administrator should use the reminor
		operation on the joined node(s) to resolve the conflict.  In
		a cluster where more than one node is joined, the
		administrator should use a base minor number which does not
		conflict on any node.

		If a version is specified with the -T option, the disk group
		is initialized with that disk group version. This limits the
		operations that can be performed and features that can be
		used to those supported by the specified disk group version.
		This makes the disk group compatible with releases of VxVM
		that support that version. If no version is specified, the
		disk group is initialized with the highest versions
		supported by the release of VxVM currently running on the
		system.	 See the vxdg upgrade operation for more
		information.

      join	Moves all objects from the imported source disk group,
		sourcedg, to the imported target disk group, targetdg. At
		the conclusion of the move, sourcedg is removed.

		The source disk group and target disk group to be joined
		must both be either private or shared.	If one disk group is
		private and the other is shared, deport and reimport the
		private disk group as shared before performing the join.

		The -o verify and -o override options modify the default
		behavior of a move, split or join operation that includes
		disks from an EMC array.  Usually, if the EMC license is
		present, the EMC disk compatibility check is performed for
		each disk that is involved in a move.  If the compatibility
		check succeeds, the normal operation takes place.  An
		internal check is made to ensure the configuration has not
		changed since the compatibility check was performed.  If it
		was changed, the entire process is retried.

		If -o verify is specified, the access names of the disks to
		be moved are returned but the operation does not take place.

		If -o override is specified, the operation is performed
		without any EMC checking.

      list	Lists the contents of disk groups.  If no diskgroup
		arguments are specified, then all disk groups are listed in
		an abbreviated one-line format.	 If diskgroup arguments are



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 vxdg(1M)			  VxVM 3.5			    vxdg(1M)
				 1 Jun 2002



		specified, then a longer format is used to indicate the
		status of the disk group, and of the specified disk group
		configuration.

		If the -q option is specified, then no header is printed
		describing output fields.  This option has no effect with
		the long formats generated with diskgroup arguments.

		In a cluster environment, if the -s option is specified, all
		cluster-shared disk groups are listed in a one-line format.
		If diskgroup arguments are specified, -s has no effect.

      listmove	Displays a list of all objects, including all objects in
		hierarchies, that would move from the imported source disk
		group, sourcedg, to the imported target disk group,
		targetdg, as implied by the specified list of objects.	The
		items in the specified object list must be top-level
		objects, disk media objects or disk access objects.

		This command is used to confirm the validity and object
		content of a proposed move operation without actually moving
		any objects.

      move	Moves the specified objects together with their hierarchies
		from the imported source disk group, sourcedg, to the
		imported target disk group, targetdg.

		The items in the object list must be top-level objects, disk
		media objects or disk access objects.  The list must define
		a set of self-contained objects, unless the -o expand option
		is specified.  (Self-contained means that the disks used by
		the selected objects should not contain any objects that are
		not selected for the move.) If the -o expand option is
		specified, the object set is expanded to be self-contained.

		The source disk group and target disk group must both be
		either private or shared.  If one disk group is private and
		the other is shared, deport and reimport the private disk
		group as shared before performing the move.

		See vxdg join for a description of the usage of the -o
		override and -o verify options.

      nohotuse	Lists free space that cannot be used by hot-relocation to
		replace failed subdisks. If a diskgroup is specified, the
		output is limited to the indicated diskgroup, otherwise
		nohotuse space from all disk groups is listed.	If disks are
		specified, by disk medianame, then the output is restricted
		to  the	 indicated  disks. A region of nohotuse space is
		identified by disk medianame, a physical  device  tag, an
		offset	relative  to  the  beginning  of the public region



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 vxdg(1M)			  VxVM 3.5			    vxdg(1M)
				 1 Jun 2002



		for the media, and a length.

		The physical device tag is a reference that indicates which
		physical device the disk media is defined on.  It appears as
		a truncated disk access name.

		If the -q option is specified, then no header is printed
		describing output fields.

      recover	Attempts to manually recover an incomplete move, split or
		join operation using either of the disk groups that was
		involved in the operation.

		In the event that the recovery cannot complete the
		operation, the -o clean option clears the MOVE flags from
		the tutil0 fields of the objects in the disk group.

		The  -o remove option removes all objects marked with the
		MOVE flag from the disk group.

      reminor	Changes the base minor number for a disk group, and
		renumbers all devices in the disk group to a range starting
		at that number.	 If the device for a volume is open, then
		the old device number remains in effect until the system is
		rebooted or until the disk group is deported and re-
		imported.  Also, if you close an open volume, then the user
		can execute vxdg reminor again to cause the renumbering to
		take effect without rebooting or reimporting.

		A new device number may also overlap with a temporary
		renumbering for a volume device. This also requires a reboot
		or reimport for the new device numbering to take effect.  A
		temporary renumbering can happen in the following
		situations: when two volumes (for example, volumes in two
		different disk groups) share the same permanently assigned
		device number, in which case one of the volumes is
		renumbered temporarily to use an alternate device number; or
		when the persistent device number for a volume was changed,
		but the active device number could not be changed to match.
		The active number may be left unchanged after a persistent
		device number change either because the volume device was
		open, or because the new number was in use as the active
		device number for another volume.

		vxdg fails if you try to use a range of numbers that is
		currently in use as a persistent (not a temporary) device
		number.	 You can force use of the number range with use of
		the -f option.	With -f, some device renumberings may not
		take effect until a reboot or a re-import (just as with open
		volumes).  Also, if you force volumes in two disk groups to
		use the same device number, then one of the volumes is



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				 1 Jun 2002



		temporarily renumbered on the next reboot.  Which volume
		device is renumbered should be considered random, except
		that device numberings in the rootdg disk group take
		precedence over all others.

		The -f option should be used only when swapping the device
		number ranges used by two or more disk groups.	To swap the
		number ranges for two disk groups, you would use -f when
		renumbering the first disk group to use the range of the
		second disk group.  Renumbering the second disk group to the
		first range does not require the use of -f.

      repldisk	Dissociates the DA record from the DM record named by
		spare-medianame, and reassociates it with the unassociated
		DM record named by  unassoc-medianame.	Both unassoc-
		medianame and spare-medianame must be members of the disk
		group named by the diskgroup argument (rootdg by default).
		However, if the -k flag is specified, then the disk media
		records for the spare-medianame are retained, although in a
		removed state.

      rmdisk	Removes the specified disk or disks from a disk group
		(rootdg by default).  The last disk cannot be removed from
		its disk group.	 It is not possible to remove the last disk
		containing a valid disk group configuration or log copy from
		its disk group.

		Typically, the rmdisk operation fails if subdisk records
		point to the named disk media records.	However, if the -k
		flag is specified, then the disk media records are kept,
		although in a removed state, and the subdisk records still
		point to them.	The subdisks, and any plexes that refer to
		them, remain unusable until the disk is re-added using the
		-k option to the adddisk operation.  Any volumes are
		disabled that become unusable because all plexes become
		unusable.

      set	Changes disk group characteristics.  Specify changes by
		entering arguments after the set keyword in the form
		attribute=value.  The only settable attribute is the
		activation mode of the disk group: activation=mode.  The
		activation mode of a disk group allows applications to read
		and write to volumes in the disk group.

		The following are the valid activation modes and
		corresponding read/write capability for non-shared disk
		groups:

		readwrite | rw
		     Volumes in the disk group are available for read and
		     write access.



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				 1 Jun 2002



		readonly | ro
		     Volumes in the disk group are available for read access
		     only.

		off  Volumes in the disk group are not available for read or
		     write access.

		For a shared disk group, the activation mode is on a per
		node basis.  The following are the valid activation modes
		and corresponding read/write capability for shared disk
		groups:

		exclusivewrite | ew
		     The node has exclusive write access to volumes in the
		     disk group.  No other node in the cluster can activate
		     the disk group for write access.

		sharedwrite | sw
		     The node has write access to volumes in the disk group.
		     Other nodes can activate the disk group for shared
		     write access.

		readonly | ro
		     The node has read access to volumes in the disk group.
		     It has no write access and denies write access to all
		     other nodes in the cluster.

		sharedread | sr
		     The node has read access to volumes in the disk group,
		     but no write access, However, other nodes can activate
		     the disk group for write access.

      spare	Lists spare space that can be used for relocating subdisks
		during recovery.  If a disk group is specified, the output
		is limited to the indicated disk group, otherwise spare
		space is listed from all disk groups.  If disks are
		specified, by disk media name, the output is restricted to
		the indicated disks.  A region of spare space is identified
		by disk media name, a physical device tag, an offset
		relative to the beginning of the public region for the
		media, and a length.

		The physical device tag is a reference that indicates which
		physical device the disk media is defined on.  It appears as
		a truncated disk access name.

		If the -q option is specified, then no header is printed
		describing output fields.

      split	Moves the specified objects together with their hierarchies
		from the imported source disk group, sourcedg, to a newly



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		created target disk group, targetdg.

		This operation fails if it would remove all the disks from
		the source disk group, or if an imported disk group exists
		with the same name as the target disk group.

		An existing deported disk group is destroyed if it has the
		same name as the target disk group (as is the case for the
		vxdg init command).

		The items in the object list must be top-level objects, disk
		media objects or disk access objects.  The list must define
		a set of self-contained objects, unless the -o expand option
		is specified.  (Self-contained means that the disks used by
		the selected objects should not contain any objects that are
		not selected for the move.) If the -o expand option is
		specified, the object set is expanded to be self-contained.

		The newly created target disk group is imported as shared if
		the source disk group is shared; otherwise, it is imported
		as private.  The -C, -f, and -t options are import options
		for the new disk group. See the description of vxdg import
		for details of their use.

		See vxdg join for a description of the usage of the -o
		override and -o verify options.

      upgrade	Upgrades the disk group to the latest VERITAS Volume Manager
		version.  By default, the disk group version is updated to
		the running version of VxVM.  The -T option upgrades the
		disk group to a specified version.  The following section
		lists each disk group version, the features it supports, and
		the VERITAS Volume Manager release that introduced it.
		Note: Some VERITAS Volume Manager versions are not available
		on all supported OS platforms.

		10   Supports only the most basic volume management features
		     of mirroring and simple striping. This format was
		     introduced in VxVM Release 1.2. Starting with VxVM
		     Release 3.0, disk groups of version 10 can be imported,
		     but no operations can be performed on the objects it
		     contains (for example, starting volumes or adding
		     mirrors). The only operation supported is to upgrade
		     the disk group to a later release.

		20   Introduced support for RAID-5 Volumes, new-style
		     stripes, recovery checkpointing, disk group
		     configuration/klog copy limiting, and Dirty Region
		     Logging. This version was introduced in VxVM Release
		     2.0 and is supported by all subsequent releases of
		     VxVM.



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		30   Enabled support for the Oracle Resilvering Interface.
		     This version was introduced in VxVM Release 2.2 and is
		     supported by all subsequent releases of VxVM.

		40   Support for Hot Relocation. Introduced in VxVM Release
		     2.3 and is supported by all subsequent releases of
		     VxVM.

		60   Support for Online Relayout, safe RAID-5 subdisk moves,
		     Striped Mirrors, and RAID-5 Snapshots. Introduced in
		     Release 3.0.

		70   Non-Persistent FastResync, VERITAS Volume Replicator
		     (VVR) enhancements, and Unrelocate.  Introduced in
		     Release 3.1.

		80   VERITAS Volume Replicator (VVR) Enhancements.
		     Introduced in Release 3.1.1.

		90   Cluster support for Oracle Resilvering, disk group
		     move, split and join, Device Discovery Layer (DDL),
		     layered volume support in clusters, ordered allocation,
		     OS independent Naming support, and Persistent
		     FastResync.  Introduced in Release 3.2.

		     To determine the version of a disk group, use the vxdg
		     list diskgroup command.

 Hardware-Specific Options
      Some environments provide guidelines to optimize VxVM's interaction
      with intelligent storage systems. If these guidelines are present,
      VxVM follows the guidelines when creating disk groups and adding disks
      to disk groups.  By default, vxdg only allows disk groups to contain
      disks that conform with these guidelines.	 The following options
      change the behavior of vxdg:

      -o override
		Performs the disk group task and ignores any storage-
		specific guidelines.  Overriding the guidelines is not
		recommended as it can result in incompatible objects, or
		objects that cannot be administered by VxVM.

      -o verify Verifies that the specified disk group task can be performed
		without violating any storage-specific guidelines, but does
		not perform the task.  If any guidelines are violated, vxdg
		exits with an error message.

		Note: These options need a specific license. Without the
		license, vxdg ignores the specified option.





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      Refer to the vendor-specific documentation for more information on how
      intelligent storage systems can interact with VxVM.

 SEE ALSO
      vxconfigd(1M), vxdctl(1M), vxdisk(1M), vxintro(1M), vxplex(1M),
      vxprint(1M), vxvol(1M)
















































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