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 install(1M)							 install(1M)




 NAME
      install - install commands

 SYNOPSIS
      /usr/sbin/install [-c dira] [-f dirb] [-i] [-n dirc] [-o] [-g group]
	   [-s] [-u user] file [dirx ...]

 DESCRIPTION
      install is a command most commonly used in ``makefiles'' (see make(1))
      to install a file (updated target file) in a specific place within a
      file system.  Each file is installed by copying it into the
      appropriate directory, thereby retaining the mode and owner of the
      original command.	 The program prints messages telling the user
      exactly what files it is replacing or creating and where they are
      going.

      install is useful for installing new commands, or new versions of
      existing commands, in the standard directories (i.e.  /usr/bin,
      /usr/sbin, etc.).

      If no options or directories (dirx...) are given, install searches a
      set of default directories (/usr/bin, /usr/sbin, /sbin, and /usr/lbin,
      in that order) for a file with the same name as file.  When the first
      occurrence is found, install issues a message saying that it is
      overwriting that file with file (the new version), and proceeds to do
      so.  If the file is not found, the program states this and exits
      without further action.

      If one or more directories (dirx ...) are specified after file, those
      directories are searched before the directories specified in the
      default list.

    Options
      Options are interpreted as follows:

	   -c dira	  Installs a new command (file) in the directory
			  specified by dira, only if it is not found.  If it
			  is found, install issues a message saying that the
			  file already exists, and exits without overwriting
			  it.  Can be used alone or with the -s option.

	   -f dirb	  Forces file to be installed in given directory,
			  whether or not one already exists.  If the file
			  being installed does not already exist, the mode
			  and owner of the new file will be set to 755 and
			  bin, respectively.  If the file already exists,
			  the mode and owner will be that of the already
			  existing file.  Can be used alone or with the -o
			  or -s options.





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 install(1M)							 install(1M)




	   -i		  Ignores default directory list, searching only
			  through the given directories (dirx ...).  Can be
			  used alone or with any other options other than -c
			  and -f.

	   -n dirc	  If file is not found in any of the searched
			  directories, it is put in the directory specified
			  in dirc.  The mode and owner of the new file will
			  be set to 755 and bin, respectively.	Can be used
			  alone or with any other options other than -c and
			  -f.

	   -o		  If file is found, this option saves the ``found''
			  file by copying it to OLDfile in the directory in
			  which it was found.  This option is useful when
			  installing a normally busy text file such as
			  /usr/bin/sh or /usr/sbin/getty, where the existing
			  file cannot be removed.  Can be used alone or with
			  any other options other than -c.

	   -g group	  Causes file to be owned by group group.  This
			  option is available only to users who have
			  appropriate privileges.  Can be used alone or with
			  any other option.

	   -u user	  Causes file to be owned by user user.	 This option
			  is available only to users who have appropriate
			  privileges.  Can be used alone or with any other
			  option.

	   -s		  Suppresses printing of messages other than error
			  messages.  Can be used alone or with any other
			  options.

      When no directories are specified (dirx ...), or when file cannot be
      placed in one of the directories specified, install checks for the
      existence of the file /etc/syslist.  If /etc/syslist exists, it is
      used to determine the final destination of file.	If /etc/syslist does
      not exist, the default directory list is further scanned to determine
      where file is to be located.

      The file /etc/syslist contains a list of absolute pathnames, one per
      line.  The pathname is the "official" destination (for example
      /usr/bin/echo) of the file as it appears on a file system.  The file
      /etc/syslist serves as a master list for system command destinations.
      If there is no entry for file in the file /etc/syslist the default
      directory list is further scanned to determine where file is to be
      located.

    Cross Generation
      The environment variable ROOT is used to locate the locations file (in



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 install(1M)							 install(1M)




      the form $ROOT/etc/syslist).  This is necessary in cases where cross
      generation is being done on a production system.	Furthermore, each
      pathname in $ROOT/etc/syslist is appended to $ROOT (for example,
      $ROOT/usr/bin/echo), and used as the destination for file.  Also, the
      default directories are also appended to $ROOT so that the default
      directories are actually $ROOT/usr/bin, $ROOT/usr/sbin, $ROOT/sbin,
      and $ROOT/usr/lbin.

      The file /etc/syslist ($ROOT/etc/syslist) does not exist on a
      distribution tape; it is created and used by local sites.

 WARNINGS
      install cannot create alias links for a command (for example, vi(1) is
      an alias link for ex(1)).

 SEE ALSO
      make(1), cpset(1M).





































 Hewlett-Packard Company	    - 3 -   HP-UX Release 11i: November 2000