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install(1)							   install(1)



NAME

  install - Installs a command

SYNOPSIS

  install [-sS]	[-c targetdir] [-g group] [-m mode] [-u	owner] file [sear-
  chdir...]

  install [-osS] [-f targetdir]	[-g group] [-m mode] [-u owner]	file [sear-
  chdir...]

  install [-g group] [-iosS] [-m mode] [-n targetdir] [-u owner] file [sear-
  chdir...]

  install [-g group] [-MosS] [-m mode] [-u owner] file [searchdir...]

  The install command installs file in a specific place	within a file system.
  It is	most often used	in makefiles.

OPTIONS

  -c targetdir
      Installs file in targetdir only if there is not already a	copy there.
      If there is a copy of file in targetdir, the command issues a message
      to that effect and exits without overwriting the file.  This option can
      be used alone or with the	-g, -m,	-s, -S,	or -u options.

  -f targetdir
      Forces installation of file in targetdir even if a copy already exists
      there.  If there is already a copy of file in targetdir, the command
      sets the new copy's mode and owner to those of the old copy.  If there
      is not already a copy of file in targetdir, the command sets the mode
      to 755 and the owner to bin. This	option can be used alone or with the
      -g, -m, -o, -s, -S, or -u	options.

  -g group
      Specifies	a group	other than bin for the destination file.

  -i  Ignores the default directory search list.  Searches for the file	to be
      installed	only in	the directories	specified on the command line (sear-
      chdir ...).  This	option cannot be used with the -c, -f, or -M options.

  -M  Moves file to targetdir instead of copying it.  This option cannot be
      used with	the -c,	-f, -i,	or -n options.

  -m mode
      Specifies	a mode other than 755 for the destination file.

  -n targetdir
      Installs file in targetdir if there is no	copy in	any of the searched
      directories (searchdir ...).  Sets the mode of the file to 755 and the
      owner to bin.  This option cannot	be used	with the -c, -f, or -M
      options.

  -o  Saves the	old copy of file by renaming it	OLDfile	and leaving it in the
      directory	where it was found.  This option cannot	be used	with the -c
      option.

  -u owner
      Specifies	an owner other than bin	for the	destination file.

  -s  Suppresses the display of	all but	error messages.

  -S  Causes the binary	to be stripped after installation; see strip(1).

DESCRIPTION

  The install command copies (or moves)	file into the appropriate directory,
  retaining the	owner and permissions of the existing copy, if any.  A newly
  created file has permission code 755,	owner bin, and group bin.  The
  install command writes a message telling you which files it is replacing or
  creating and where they are going.

  If you supply	no options or search directories (searchdir ...), the install
  command searches the /bin, /usr/bin, /etc, /lib, and /usr/lib	directories
  in that order	for a file with	the same name as file.	The command
  overwrites the first matching	file with file and issues a message indicat-
  ing that it has done so.  If no match	is found, the command tells you	and
  exits	without	taking further action.

  If any search	directories (searchdir ...) are	specified on the command
  line,	the install command searches them before it searches the default
  directories.

EXAMPLES

   1.  To replace a command that already exists	in one of the default direc-
       tories, enter:
	    install  fixit

       This replaces the file fixit if it is found in the /bin,	/usr/bin,
       /etc, /lib, or /usr/lib directory. Otherwise, the file fixit is not
       installed.  For example,	if /usr/bin/fixit exists, then this file is
       replaced	by a copy of the file fixit in the current directory.

   2.  To replace a command that already exists	in a specified or default
       directory while preserving the old version, enter:
	    install  -o	 fixit	/etc  /usr/games

       This replaces the file fixit if it is found in the /etc or /usr/games
       directory, or in	one of the default directories.	Otherwise, the file
       fixit is	not installed.	If the file is replaced, the old version is
       preserved by renaming it	OLDfixit in the	directory in which it was
       found.

   3.  To replace a command that already exists	in a specified directory,
       enter:
	    install  -i	 fixit	/u/judith/bin  /u/bernice/bin  /usr/games

       This replaces the file fixit if it is found in the /u/judith/bin,
       /u/bernice/bin, or /usr/games directory.	 Otherwise, the	file is	not
       installed.

   4.  To replace a command found in a default directory, or install it	in a
       specified directory if it is not	found, enter:
	    install  -n	 /usr/bin  fixit

       This replaces the file fixit if it is found in one of the default
       directories.  If	the file is not	found, it is installed as
       /usr/bin/fixit.

   5.  To install a new	command, enter:
	    install  -c	 /usr/bin  fixit

       This creates a new command by installing	a copy of the fixit file as
       /usr/bin/fixit, but only	if this	file does not already exist.

   6.  To install a command in a specified directory whether or	not it
       already exists, enter:
	    install  -f	 /usr/bin  -o  -s  fixit

       This forces the fixit file to be	installed as /usr/bin/fixit whether
       or not /usr/bin/fixit already exists.  The old version, if any, is
       preserved by renaming it	to /usr/bin/OLDfixit (a	result of the -o
       option).	 The messages that tell	where the new command was installed
       are suppressed (a result	of the -s option).

SEE ALSO

  Commands:  chgrp(1), chmod(1), chown(1), cp(1), installbsd(1), make(1),
  mv(1), strip(1)