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 cue(1)								      cue(1)
			       Series 800 Only



 NAME
      cue - HP Character-Terminal User Environment (CUE)

 SYNOPSIS
      /usr/bin/cue

 DESCRIPTION
      CUE provides an easy-to-use, attractive, customizable environment that
      allows users on Series 800 HP-UX systems to easily identify themselves
      to the system and begin a work session.  See DEPENDENCIES for
      supported terminal types.

      A menubar is available for changing the native language of the
      session, changing the type of session to start upon a successful
      login, or getting on-line help.  To obtain context-sensitive help at
      any time, press the function key labeled HELP (f1).

      A pulldown menu and function keys (f1-f8) are displayed, allowing the
      user to modify various options or to get help.  Before the login is
      initiated, the user has the option of interactively changing the
      native language of the session and the type of session to start upon a
      successful login.

      The default native language is C, but the language is easily
      modifiable by entering the Language Menu which is accessible by
      selecting the Configuration item in the menu bar.	 The native language
      can also be specified as a parameter to cuegetty (see cuegetty(1M)).

      The default session type is the POSIX shell, sh, but the session type
      can be easily changed to tsm, keysh, or csh by entering the Session
      Type Menu which is accessible by selecting the Configuration item in
      the menu bar.

      The following standard login features are available:

	   +  password aging

	   +  logging invalid login attempts in /var/adm/btmp

	   +  list of valid ttys for super-user login

      CUE displays a visual screen that prompts for the username and
      corresponding password.  If your username does not have a password,
      press the <carriage return> key to skip this field.  Terminal echo is
      turned off (where possible) during typing of the password so that it
      will not appear on any written record of the session.  After three
      unsuccessful login attempts, a hangup signal is issued.

      If password aging has been invoked by the super-user on your behalf,
      your password may have expired.  In this case, you will be diverted
      into passwd to change it, after which you can attempt to login again.



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 cue(1)								      cue(1)
			       Series 800 Only



      See passwd(1).

      If login is not successfully completed within a certain period of time
      (e.g., five minutes), the terminal may be silently disconnected.

      After a successful login, the accounting files are updated,
      initializing the user and group ids, group access list, and working
      directory.  If the session type chosen is tsm, the SHELL to start in
      each tsm session is determined from corresponding user entries in the
      /etc/passwd file.	 cue then forks the appropriate shell by using the
      last component of the shell pathname preceded by a - (for example, -sh
      or -ksh).	 When the session type is invoked with its name preceded by
      a minus in this manner, the shell performs its own initialization,
      including execution of profile, login, or other initialization
      scripts.

      For example, if the user login shell is sh(1) or ksh(1) the shell
      executes the profile files /etc/profile and $HOME/.profile if they
      exist (and possibly others as well).  Depending on the contents of the
      profile files, messages regarding mail in your mail file or any
      messages you may have received since your last login may be displayed.
      At this point, cuesession is started to perform accounting procedures,
      display messages, and start your session.

      If /var/adm/btmp is present, all unsuccessful login attempts are
      logged to this file.  This feature is disabled if the file is not
      present.	A summary of bad login attempts can be viewed by users with
      appropriate privileges by using lastb, see last(1M).

      If /etc/securetty is present, login security is in effect, meaning
      that only users with appropriate privileges are allowed to login
      successfully on the ttys listed in this file.  Restricted ttys are
      listed by device name, one per line.  Valid tty names are dependent on
      installation.  Some examples could be console, tty01, ttya1, etc.
      Note that this feature does not inhibit a normal user from using su.

    Starting Cue
      There are several methods that can be used to start cue.

	   +  An entry for cuegetty can be placed in the /etc/inittab file.
	      See cuegetty(1M)).  This is the preferred method as the user
	      does not need to do anything further to start cue.

	   +  Start cue from the command line by typing: cue.

	   +  Start cue by making it the last entry in the user's .login
	      configuration file.

      Multiple cue logins may run simultaneously on separate terminals
      attached to the same local host.	cuegetty can be configured in the
      /etc/inittab file for all users.



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 cue(1)								      cue(1)
			       Series 800 Only



      Remote users to the CUE system must access CUE by entering the cue
      command at the command-line prompt or as the last item in the user's
      .login configuration file.

 EXTERNAL INFLUENCES
    Environment Variables
      cue invokes the user's session with the following default environment:

      CUESESSION     is set to the session type selected.  Valid values are:

			  /usr/bin/sh		   POSIX Shell (DEFAULT)

			  /usr/bin/tsm		   manages up to 10 sessions
						   at once

			  /usr/bin/keysh	   Easy Context-Sensitive
						   Softkey Shell

			  /usr/bin/ksh		   Korn Shell

			  /usr/bin/csh		   C Shell

      HOME	     is set to the home directory of the user

      LANG	     is set to the native language selected (C is the
		     default)

      LOGNAME	     is set to the user name

      MAIL	     is set to /var/mail/$LOGNAME

      NLSPATH	     is set to the path applications search for NLS message
		     catalogs, usually /usr/lib/nls/%L/%N.cat

      PATH	     is set to the path to be searched for commands
		     :/usr/bin

      SHELL	     is set to the user's default shell (from /etc/passwd)

      Several methods are available to modify or add to this list depending
      on the desired scope of the resulting environment variable.

      Basic environment variables can be set for all CUE users on a system
      by setting the values in /etc/profile and /etc/csh.login.	 Personal
      environment variables can be set on a per-user basis in the script
      file $HOME/.profile for sh and ksh users or .cshrc for csh users.

      Note that alias and function definitions need to be included in the
      file specified by ENV for ksh, as this file will be sourced for each
      invocation of the shell.	For csh users, the .cshrc file should be
      structured such that it cannot generate any output on standard output



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 cue(1)								      cue(1)
			       Series 800 Only



      or standard error, including occasions when it is invoked without an
      affiliated terminal.  The rcp command sources the .cshrc file and any
      output generated by this file, even to standard error, causes
      problems.	 Commands such as stty should be placed in the .login file,
      not in .cshrc, so that their output cannot affect rcp.

      For users with appropriate privileges, PATH is augmented to include
      /etc.

    VT320 Terminal Support
      Because the VT320 terminal has predefined local functions for keys
      labeled as F1, F2, F3 and F4, users should use following mapping when
      they desire to use function keys:

	   HP or Wyse60	       VT320 or HP 700/60 in VT320 mode

	   F1		       PF2  !

	   F2		       PF1  !

	   F3		       space bar

	   F4		       PF3  !

	   F5		       F10, [ EXIT ], F5  *

	   F6		       none

	   F7		       F18, first unlabeled key to right of
			       Pause/Break*

	   F8		       F19, second unlabeled key to right of
			       Pause/Break*

	   *	When using PC-AT keyboard with HP 700/60 in VT320 mode

	   !	See "Configuration: HP 700/60 in DEC mode, or DEC terminals
		with PC-AT type keyboard"

	   Further, since DEC terminals do not support softkey menu, no such
	   menu is displayed on these terminals.

	   Many applications tend to use TAB for forward navigation (moving
	   from one field to another) and shift-TAB is used for backward
	   navigation.	Users having DEC terminals or using terminals in DEC
	   emulation modes such as VT100 or VT320 may note that these
	   terminals/emulators may give out same character for TAB and
	   shift-TAB. As such, it is impossible for an application to
	   distinguish between TAB and shift-TAB, and both of them treated
	   as if a TAB key was pressed. It might present slight overhead to
	   users in case they want to go backwards. Now instead, they should



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 cue(1)								      cue(1)
			       Series 800 Only



	   complete rest of the inputs and get back to the desired field
	   later.

    VT100 Terminal Support
      VT100 does not allow the (f1-f8) function keys to be configured.
      Therefore, the following keyboard mappings will apply to VT100
      terminals:

	   HP or Wyse60	       VT100 or HP 700/60 in VT100 mode

	   F1		       PF2  !

	   F2		       PF1  !

	   F3		       space bar

	   F4		       [PF3], [space bar] or [PF3], [=]	 !

	   F5		       return

	   F6		       none

	   F7		       none

	   F8		       none

	   !	See "Configuration: HP 700/60 in DEC mode, or DEC terminals
		with PC-AT type keyboard"

	   Further, since DEC terminals do not support softkey menu, no such
	   menu is displayed on these terminals.

	   Many applications tend to use TAB for forward navigation (moving
	   from one field to another) and shift-TAB is used for backward
	   navigation.	Users having DEC terminals or using terminals in DEC
	   emulation modes such as VT100 or VT320 may note that these
	   terminals/emulators may give out same character for TAB and
	   shift-TAB. As such, it is impossible for an application to
	   distinguish between TAB and shift-TAB, and both of them treated
	   as if a TAB key was pressed. It might present slight overhead to
	   users in case they want to go backwards. Now instead, they should
	   complete rest of the inputs and get back to the desired field
	   later.

    Configuration: HP 700/60 terminal in DEC mode, or DEC terminal with PC-
      AT type keyboard
      Customers using the following configuration may want to be aware of
      the following keyboard difference.

      It may be possible for a user with the "HP 700/60 terminal in DEC
      mode, or DEC terminal with PC-AT type keyboard" configuration to be



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 cue(1)								      cue(1)
			       Series 800 Only



      told to press function key F1 through F4 to achieve some desired
      result. For HP 700/60 terminal in DEC mode or DEC terminals, these
      functions keys may be mapped onto PF1-PF4 keys.  (see "Keyboard
      Mappings"). However, the PC-AT type keyboard does not provide PF1,
      PF2, PF3, or PF4 keys, as does the DEC/ANSI keyboard.

      Keyboard Mappings

	   "Num Lock"	       maps to	"PF1"

	   "/"		       maps to	"PF2"

	   "*"		       maps to	"PF3"

	   "-"		       maps to	"PF4"

	   The "Num Lock", "/", "*", and "-" keys are located on the
	   keyboard, in a row, above the number pad on the right side of the
	   keyboard. Please note that although this keyboard is called a
	   PC-AT type keyboard, it is supplied by HP. A PC-AT type keyboard
	   can be recognized by location of ESC key at the left-top of the
	   keyboard.

    Wyse60 Terminal Support
      On Wyse60, use DEL (located next to Backspace) key to backspace.	On
      an HP 700/60 with a PC-AT type keyboard in Wyse60 mode, the DEL key is
      located in the bottom row on the number pad.

      Wyse60 terminals provide a single line to display softkey labels
      unlike HP terminals which provide two lines.  Sometimes this may
      result in truncated softkey labels.  For example, "Help on Context"
      label for F1 may appear as "Help on C".  Some standard labels for
      screen-oriented applications such as SAM and swinstall are as follows:

	   On wyse60 may appear as ..	      means

	   Help On C			      Help On Context

	   Select/D			      Select/Deselect

	   Menubar			      Menubar on/off

    Internationalization
      All screens, labels, and messages are localizable.  The message
      catalog cue.cat contains the localized representations of the default
      labels and messages.  cue will read the appropriate message catalog
      indicated by the LANG environment variable and display the localized
      strings.	By selecting a native language in the Language Menu, the
      language of the CUE screens and the future work session can be
      specified.  If the the message catalog exists for cue in the language
      selected, cue will be redisplayed in that language.  If not, the CUE



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 cue(1)								      cue(1)
			       Series 800 Only



      screens will continue in the current language and the work session
      that is started after a successful login will be started in the
      language selected.  In either case, the LANG environment variable will
      be set appropriately for the resulting work session.

      If cue will be started on the command line or as the last item in the
      .login file, the CUE screens will be brought up using the language
      specified by the LANG environment variable.  If CUE screens do not
      exist, then the default native language, C, will be used.

      To use cue with Asian languages, the AWTERM environment variable must
      be set to hpterm-asian.  This will allow the text in Asian fonts to be
      displayed properly by cue.

      If cue will be started by cuegetty, it is possible to start up the CUE
      Login Screens in a language other than the default, C, by invoking
      cuegetty with the -L nls_language option.	 Of course, CUE screens and
      the cue.cat file must exist for the nls_language specified.

 DEPENDENCIES
      CUE is available only on Series 800 systems, and is compatible only
      with the following terminals:


	   HP700/92    HP700/94	   HP2392    HP2394    VT320	VT100	 WYSE60

 WARNINGS
      cue is an HP proprietary command, which will be obsoleted in a future
      release, and is not portable to other vendor's platforms.

 FILES
      /var/adm/btmp			      history of bad login attempts
      /etc/logingroup			      group file - defines group
					      access lists
      /etc/motd				      message-of-the-day
      /etc/passwd			      password file - defines users,
					      passwords, and primary groups
      /etc/profile			      system profile (initialization
					      for all users)
      /etc/securetty			      list of valid ttys for root
					      login
      /etc/utmp				      users currently logged in
      /var/adm/wtmp			      history of logins, logouts,
					      and date changes
      /var/mail/your-name		      mailbox for user your-name
      /usr/bin/cue			      cue executable
      /usr/sbin/cuegetty		      cuegetty executable
      /usr/newconfig/etc/cue.inittab			template for
							/etc/inittab
      /etc/cue.dm			      screen descriptions




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 cue(1)								      cue(1)
			       Series 800 Only



      /usr/lbin/cuesession		      starts selected session type
      /usr/lib/nls/$LANG/cue.cat	      NLS message catalog
      /usr/share/man/man1.Z/cue.1	      man page for cue(1)
      /usr/share/man/man1m.Z/cuegetty.1m		man page for
							cuegetty(1M)

 SEE ALSO
      csh(1), cuegetty(1M), env(1), keysh(1), ksh(1), login(1), passwd(1),
      sh(1), tsm(1), btmp(4), environ(5), hpnls(5), lang(5).













































 Hewlett-Packard Company	    - 8 -   HP-UX Release 11i: November 2000